cbt for pain

CBT for Pain: Johns Hopkins study shows Improvement

Researchers at Johns Hopkins showed CBT for pain management with patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA) significantly  improved their symptoms.  Patients in the study reported significantly lower levels of pain after CBT sessions.  Additionally, patients with KOA in the study reported improved quality of sleep.  The new double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial findings were published online January 26 in Arthritis and Rheumatology.  Jennifer Garcia summarizes the results of the study in the February 25, 2015, edition of OrthoSpineNew.

Holly Scott of Uptown Dallas Counseling specializes in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT).

CBT For Weight Loss

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The concepts from Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)  can be especially helpful when trying to lose weight.  In this week’s ReadersINC blog post, Anthony Healy, a personal trainer at Vivacia, outlines ideas on motivation for weight loss.  Each of these ideas is an example of techniques learned during Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.

go to site Here are Anthony’s top tips on how to motivate yourself to lose weight:

1. Decide why you want to lose weight

Is it to look good in a bikini, to feel better about yourself or another reason?

2. Set goals

‘Lose weight’ is too vague. You need a clear and achievable goal, such as ‘lose 10lb in 10 weeks’. Write down how you’re going to achieve this, such as ‘run three times a week’ or ‘go to the gym every Monday, Wednesday and Friday’ and STICK TO IT.

2. Create visual goals

Visual cues are a great motivator. If you want to look good on the beach in a size 10 bikini then buy that bikini (or dress for special occasion/favorite pair of jeans) and hang it outside your wardrobe.

3. Write a morning mantra

Write and then read a motivational mantra every day. Make the goal seem like something that has already having been achieved,

E.g. “I have successfully lost 10lbs, and I am about to board the plane for Spain at Heathrow airport. I can’t wait to get to the beach in my yellow bikini….”

By doing so you get the good feelings associated with the goal ahead of time.

4. Kick the bad habits

Long-term transformations take time.

To get quick results and keep the weight off you need to kick bad habits.

In the beginning you need to go cold turkey. For many people the enemy is booze, processed food and/or sugar in all its forms – most obviously, chocolate and sweets.

Giving these up for at least 6-12 weeks “breaks the back” of the usual suspects, forms some good eating habits, and brings about those quick results – which will keep you motivated and “hungry” for more success.

5. Think positive

With sufficient motivation anything is achievable, and those obstacles can now be overcome.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) Introduction

The Cognitive Model (CBT): An introductory Explanation:

Two different people can react very differently to identical situations.  The basic premise of CBT is based on explaining WHY this happens, and HOW you can control your reactions.  Here is an example:

Situation #1:  Boss and new employee number 1 talking in a conference room.  Boss says to the employee, “You are a nice person.  I like you.” 

Automatic Thought of Employee #1:  “He likes me.  That is great, I must be making a positive cognitive behavioral therapy and confidenceimpression”

Emotion of Employee #1:  Happiness

Behavior of Employee #1:  Smiles and leans forward.

Physical Response of Employee #1:  Relaxation

Situation #2: Boss and new employee #2 are talking in a conference room.  Boss says to employee #2, “You are a nice person.  I like you.”

Automatic Thought of Employee #2: “No one ever likes me immediately.  My boss is lying to me.  I cannot trust him.”CBT anxiety

Emotion of Employee #2:  Anxiety

Behavior of Employee #2:  Frowns and looks down.

Physical Response of Employee #2:  Increased heart rate.

The Automatic Thought of each employee creates very different reactions to identical situations.  During Cognitive Therapy, clients learn to identify, challenge, and change these automatic thoughts.

For more information on CBT, contact Holly@UptownDallasCounseling.com

 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Cognitive Restructuring

CBT uptown DallasCognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is based on the theory that our Thoughts, Emotions, and Behaviors all impact each other.

During therapy, the client learns how to identify distorted thinking patterns.  The client then learns the connection between distorted thinking and her emotions and behaviors.   By making changes to distorted thinking, the client experiences changes in feelings.

 

A CBT therapist teaches clients techniques to make theses changes.  Cognitive restructuring is a key technique of CBT therapy.  Dr. Aaron Beck, the founder of Cognitive Therapy, talks about cognitive restructuring techniques.

CBT Uptown Dallas Counseling

Dr. Aaron Beck, founder of CBT

Bravo, Kate Middleton!

HRH Duchess of Cambridge

Kate Middleton

In this video, HRH The Duchess of Cambridge pledges her support for children’s mental health by endorsing The Place to Be, a charitable organization for children in the UK.  The Pace to Be is “the leading UK provider of school-based mental health support, unlocking children’s potential in the classroom – and beyond.”

The Place to be has declared February 16-22 the first Children’s Mental Health Week in the UK.  Thanks to all who are bringing this important message to the public.

#ChildrensMHW

Uptown Dallas Counseling provides CBT: Aaron Beck’s Blueprint

CBT Uptown Dallas Counseling

Dr. Aaron Beck, founder of CBT

Uptown Dallas Counseling provides CBT or Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.  The founder of CBT, Dr. Aaron Beck, explains his view of CBT in this 6-minute audio track.

Dr. Beck founded the Beck Institute of Cognitive Therapy in 1994.  From the Beck Institute website:

Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy is a leading international source for training, therapy, and resources in CBT. Our Center for Training delivers workshops to a worldwide audience of mental health professionals, researchers, and educators, and our Philadelphia-based Center for Psychotherapy provides state-of-the-art therapy and consultations.
Dr. Aaron T. Beck developed Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) at the University of Pennsylvania in the 1960s. In 1994, Dr. Beck and his daughter, Dr. Judith Beck, established Beck Institute as a non-profit 501(c)(3). Their goal was to create a new clinical setting that would provide both state-of-the-art psychotherapy and comprehensive training opportunities for professionals worldwide.
Over the past 20 years, our organization has carried out Dr. Beck’s therapeutic model and guiding principles in training more than 3,500 professionals through our Center for Training, and providing clinical therapy services to over 2,000 individuals, couples, and families through our Center for Psychotherapy.
In addition to our professional workshops and on-site psychotherapy practice, Beck Institute remains an international authority on, and resource for, CBT information and research. Our organization continues to partner with universities, hospitals, community mental health centers, health systems, and other institutions to create and improve cognitive behavior therapy programs.

Uptown Dallas Counseling provides CBT for anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, and other mental health problems.

CBT for Weight Loss in Dallas

Weight LossLooking for CBT for Weight Loss in the Dallas area?  Uptown Dallas Counseling can help.

From The Beck Diet Solution workbook:  Feeling deprived is a state of mind. You can limit yourself to one cookie and think, “This is so unfair, I wish I could eat more, this really stinks,” OR you could limit yourself to one cookie and think, “It’s not all-or-nothing. I can still have one cookie and lose weight. Good for me for stopping here, this will really help me reach my goals.”

If you are looking for help in using CBT for Weight Loss in Dallas, Uptown Dallas Counseling can help.

Uptown Dallas Counseling Favorite Post

Uptown Dallas Counseling shares a favorite post from 2014:

Comedian and actress Ruby Wax gave a TED talk where she spoke about her struggles with depression. She used lots of comedy mixed with some serious science and statistics about depression.
According to the World Health Organization, 1 in 4 people will experience a mental health issue at some point in their lives, but two-thirds will never seek help from a professional. Even when you isolate the U.S. population, the numbers are the same.
If you are suffering from depression or other type of mental illness, seek help from a professional. You are not alone. You do not have to go through this alone.
TED talk by Ruby Wax on Mental Illness
uptown dallas counseling happiness

Uptown Dallas Counseling writes about Diet and Mental Health

mental health and diet

From the University of Melbourne via Uptown Dallas Counseling:

Evidence is rapidly growing showing vital relationships between both diet quality and potential nutritional deficiencies and mental health, a new international collaboration led by the University of Melbourne and Deakin University has revealed.

Published in The Lancet Psychiatry today, leading academics state that as with a range of medical conditions, psychiatry and public health should now recognize and embrace diet and nutrition as key determinants of mental health.

Lead author, Dr Jerome Sarris from the University of Melbourne and a member of the International Society for Nutritional Psychiatry Research (ISNPR), said psychiatry is at a critical stage, with the current medically-focused model having achieved only modest benefits in addressing the global burden of poor mental health.

“While the determinants of mental health are complex, the emerging and compelling evidence for nutrition as a key factor in the high prevalence and incidence of mental disorders suggests that nutrition is as important to psychiatry as it is to cardiology, endocrinology and gastroenterology,” Dr Sarris said.

“In the last few years, significant links have been established between nutritional quality and mental health. Scientifically rigorous studies have made important contributions to our understanding of the role of nutrition in mental health,” he said.

Findings of the review revealed that in addition to dietary improvement, evidence now supports the contention that nutrient-based prescription has the potential to assist in the management of mental disorders at the individual and population level.

Studies show that many of these nutrients have a clear link to brain health, including omega-3s, B vitamins (particularly folate and B12), choline, iron, zinc, magnesium, S-adenosyl methionine (SAMe), vitamin D, and amino acids.

“While we advocate for these to be consumed in the diet where possible, additional select prescription of these as nutraceuticals (nutrient supplements) may also be justified,” Dr Sarris said.

Associate Professor Felice Jacka, a Principal Research Fellow from Deakin University and president of the ISNPR noted that many studies have shown associations between healthy dietary patterns and a reduced prevalence of and risk for depression and suicide across cultures and age groups.

“Maternal and early-life nutrition is also emerging as a factor in mental health outcomes in children, while severe deficiencies in some essential nutrients during critical developmental periods have long been implicated in the development of both depressive and psychotic disorders,” she said.

A systematic review published in late 2014 has also confirmed a relationship between ‘unhealthy’ dietary patterns and poorer mental health in children and adolescents. Given the early age of onset for depression and anxiety, these data point to dietary improvement as a way of preventing the initial incidence of common mental disorders.

Dr Sarris, an executive member of the ISNPR, believes that it is time to advocate for a more integrative approach to psychiatry, with diet and nutrition as key elements.

“It is time for clinicians to consider diet and additional nutrients as part of the treating package to manage the enormous burden of mental ill health,” he said.

Counseling for the NEW YEAR

Thinking about seeking counseling for the New Year’s Resolutions you made?
where to buy diflucan over the counter Four Simple Strategies for Improving Mental Health
Every year, many of us resolve to improve our health — by losing 10 pounds, hitting the gym more often or quitting smoking. All are valuable goals. But our  mental health also deserves attention.
“Your mental health is crucial to your well-being and happinessIf you are not mentally healthy, it will take a bodily toll,” says Jon Allen, PhD, a senior psychologist at Menninger. He adds that physical and mental health are inextricable — for example, lack of sleep is associated with depression, increased stress and anxiety, and exacerbates existing mental illness. On the flip side, exercise helps improve mood and can lift depression.
To improve your mental health, Allen recommends a “body first” approach, which includes getting enough sleep, eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly. And we can do even more to improve our mental well-being. Here are some simple strategies that can make a significant impact on your mental health this year.
  1. Accept what we can’t change. This time of year, we make lofty resolutions and seek quick changes to fix our problems, setting ourselves up for failure (think of gyms packed full in January, but empty by February). Our time might be better spent cultivating acceptance of what we can’t change, like a big city’s traffic jams, or a perceived physical flaw, says psychologistThomas Ellis, PsyD, ABPP, Menninger’s director of Psychology. “Very often positive mental health involves coming to terms with our weakness and shortcomings, and accepting that none of us is perfect,” Ellis says. It’s not easy, he admits, and requires practicing mindfulness, and learning to live in the present moment.
  2. Develop a commitment device. If you do decide to make a change, automate it with acommitment device — a way to lock yourself into an action and help you meet your goals. Clients in Menninger’s Pathfinder program, a community re-integration program, often use this technique to incorporate mentally healthy behaviors in their lives. For example, clients who want to commit to an exercise plan may have a friend come pick them up for workouts, saysBrad Kennedy, director of Rehabilitation Services. “We also have some clients who participate in an early morning meditation group at work. They keep their work clothes at work, to compel them to come into work early and attend the group, instead of sleeping in.”
  3. Spend time near someone your trust. “Research shows that just being in the presence of someone we trust is the most powerful way to reduce distress,” Allen says. Most advice to improve mental health focuses on individual efforts at self-regulation — exercising, meditation, relaxationAlthough such methods are very important for all of us, “they are not as effective asinterpersonal regulation of stress. We do our best when we outsource our stress regulation to trusted companions and confidants.” For people who don’t have strong relationships, Allen says a good way to forge connections is to join a structured group, such as church or community group, a club organized around a hobby or interest or a 12-step group or support group for people struggling with substance abuse or mental illness. A trained therapist also can provide guidance on building and nurturing relationships.
  4. Find a purpose and spend time nurturing it. Philosophers throughout the ages, including Freud, the father of psychoanalysis, have singled out love and work as central to good mental health. The same holds true today. Love doesn’t have to be romantic; it can be spiritual in nature, or directed toward family, friends or a shared purpose. Allen says work can be done in the pursuit of money, but it doesn’t have to be paid, as long as it is some form of “productive engagement,” such as taking care of family, volunteering in the community or following a creative pursuit. “A sense of purpose is essential to mental health,” Ellis adds. “Patients often talk about a feeling a sense of meaninglessness in their lives. If there is not a sense of meaning and purpose, it is very difficult to be happy.”
Improving mental health is not always easy, Ellis emphasizes, and sometimes it helps to enlist the help of a mental health professional. But progress is within our power. “There is a strong correspondence between the things we do and how we feel. How we process information and how we take action in our lives impacts our mental health. In other words, our biochemistry is not fate. There are ways we can work through adversity and feel better.”

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