Is your family watching 13 Reasons Why?

If you and your family are watching source url 13 Reasons Why? on Netflix, you may want to have some discussions on the topic of suicide. From the Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC)’s newsletter, April 7, 2017:

suicide

Photo Courtesy of Netflix

Suicide Awareness Voices of Education (SAVE) has released a set of talking points to address suicide-related content in the new Netflix series, 13 Reasons Why, which is based on a fictional novel by the same name. SAVE developed the talking points in partnership with the Jed Foundation to help parents, teachers, and other gatekeepers talk with youth about suicide as it relates to the situational drama that unfolds in the series.

SUICIDE

Self Care: An Important Part of Health

cbt and self care

 

When clients come to my office for Proscalpin with out a prescription Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), we work to solve their  problems using methods exactly as the name implies.

  • We use a  Cognitive approach by recognizing, challenging, & changing irrational thoughts.
  • We use a Behavioral approach by assessing current behaviors and determining if changes could improve mental health.

 

On the Behavioral side, one of the powerful changes a person can make is to focus more on Self Care.  Some small changes in routines can have a significant positive impact on anxiety, depression, and anger management.

Self Care Suggestions

 

For some suggestions on adding more Self Care to your life, Annie Wright Psychotherapy via Upworthy.com offers some ideas. 

101 ways to take care of yourself when the world feels overwhelming

 

If you suffer from sleep anxiety or depression, choosing to add few of these things to your to-do list could result in big changes.  Some of my favorites from this list are:

  • breaking up my day into small tasks
  • writing lists things I love
  • taking a break from all tech

 

Enjoy!

Depression in Seniors is Often Unnoticed

depression uptown dallas counseling

Family members and even primary healthcare providers often mistake an older adult’s symptoms of depression as just a natural reaction to illness or an unavoidable part of the aging process. Older adults themselves often share this belief and suffer unnecessarily because they don’t understand that they could feel better with appropriate treatment.

Statistics on Mental Health and Seniors

Recent data indicate that an estimated 20.4 percent of adults aged 65 and older met criteria for a mental disorder. (Karel, Gatz & Smyer, 2012). The CDC’s 2013 report on The State of Aging and Health in America identified “addressing mental distress among older adults” as one of its primary Calls To Action needed to improve the health and well-being of older adults.  The CDC estimates:  About 25% of adults aged 65 years or older have some type of mental health problem, such as a mood disorder not associated with normal aging. Mental distress is a problem by itself, and it has been associated with unhealthy behaviors than can interfere with self-management and inhibit recovery from an illness.  

How Can we Help Change these Statistics?

Talking to seniors about their mental health can be challenging. Family members, caregivers, and even many medical professionals are not trained to assess mental disorders.  Conversations can be awkward.  Seniors are often reluctant to talk about their symptoms.  

The most common mental disorder among older adults is depression.  Depression, once diagnosed, often responds quickly to treatment.  Most older adults with depression improve when they receive treatment with an antidepressant, psychotherapy, or a combination of both. If left untreated, however, depression may result in the onset of physical, cognitive, functional, and social impairment, as well as decreased quality of life. 

If you suspect an older adult has depression, there is an easy, direct way to talk with them about their symptoms.  The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) is a reliable 15-question assessment that anyone can use.  Ask the senior to answer the following questions:

Geriatric Depression Scale: Short Form
Choose the best answer for how you have felt over the past week:
1. Are you basically satisfied with your life? YES / NO
2. Have you dropped many of your activities and interests? YES / NO
3. Do you feel that your life is empty? YES / NO
4. Do you often get bored? YES / NO
5. Are you in good spirits most of the time? YES / NO
6. Are you afraid that something bad is going to happen to you? YES / NO
7. Do you feel happy most of the time? YES / NO
8. Do you often feel helpless? YES / NO
9. Do you prefer to stay at home, rather than going out and doing new things? YES / NO
10. Do you feel you have more problems with memory than most? YES / NO
11. Do you think it is wonderful to be alive now? YES / NO
12. Do you feel pretty worthless the way you are now? YES / NO
13. Do you feel full of energy? YES / NO
14. Do you feel that your situation is hopeless? YES / NO
15. Do you think that most people are better off than you are? YES / NO

Answers in bold indicate depression. Score 1 point for each bolded answer.
A score > 5 points is suggestive of depression.
A score ≥ 10 points is almost always indicative of depression.

Source: http://www.stanford.edu/~yesavage/GDS.html
This scale is in the public domain.

Any score greater than 5  warrants a follow-up assessment by a medical professional. If your senior scores higher than 5, help them schedule an appointment to discuss the results and form a treatment plan with a healthcare provider.

If you or someone you care about is in crisis, please seek help immediately using one of the following methods:

  • Call 911
  • Visit a nearby emergency department or your health care provider’s office
  • Call the toll-free, 24-hour hotline of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255); TTY: 1-800-799-4TTY (4889) to talk to a trained counselor

Sources: 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The State of Aging and Health in America 2013. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Dept of Health and Human Services; 2013.

Karel, M. J., Gatz, M. & Smyer, M. A. (2012). Aging and mental health in the decade ahead: What psychologists need to know. American Psychologist, 67, 184-198.

Lyness JM, Noel T, Cox C, King DA, Conwell Y, Caine ED. Screening for Depression in Elderly Primary Care Patients: A Comparison of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies—Depression Scale and the Geriatric Depression Scale. Arch Intern Med. 1997;157(4):449-454. doi:10.1001/archinte.1997.00440250107012.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National
Institutes of Health, National Institute of Mental Health. (2015).
Depression (NIH Publication No. 15-3561). Bethesda, MD: U.S.
Government Printing Office.

 

 

Depression: Waiting 10 Years for Help

depression uptown dallas
One in 10 Americans are suffering from Depression at any given time. Are you worried someone you know may be more than just sad? It is often hard to know the difference between Clinical Depression and sadness. In this 4-minute Ted-Ed video, Helen M. Farrell examines the symptoms and treatments of depression, and gives some tips for how you might help a friend who is suffering.

A surprising statistic from the video:
An individual waits and average of 10 years to seek help for depression.

Lisa Adams Gave Us So Much

Lisa Bonchek Adams died this week after a long and public battle with metastatic breast cancer.  Her blog and social media presence offered caring wisdom to so many people affected by cancer.  One of her last tweets was “Make the Most of Your Day.”  Please take the time to read this article in the New York times about the positive impact she had on the lives of so many.Lisa Bonchek Adams

Bravo, Kate Middleton!

HRH Duchess of Cambridge

Kate Middleton

In this video, HRH The Duchess of Cambridge pledges her support for children’s mental health by endorsing The Place to Be, a charitable organization for children in the UK.  The Pace to Be is “the leading UK provider of school-based mental health support, unlocking children’s potential in the classroom – and beyond.”

The Place to be has declared February 16-22 the first Children’s Mental Health Week in the UK.  Thanks to all who are bringing this important message to the public.

#ChildrensMHW

Uptown Dallas Counseling provides CBT: Aaron Beck’s Blueprint

CBT Uptown Dallas Counseling

Dr. Aaron Beck, founder of CBT

Uptown Dallas Counseling provides CBT or Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.  The founder of CBT, Dr. Aaron Beck, explains his view of CBT in this 6-minute audio track.

Dr. Beck founded the Beck Institute of Cognitive Therapy in 1994.  From the Beck Institute website:

Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy is a leading international source for training, therapy, and resources in CBT. Our Center for Training delivers workshops to a worldwide audience of mental health professionals, researchers, and educators, and our Philadelphia-based Center for Psychotherapy provides state-of-the-art therapy and consultations.
Dr. Aaron T. Beck developed Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) at the University of Pennsylvania in the 1960s. In 1994, Dr. Beck and his daughter, Dr. Judith Beck, established Beck Institute as a non-profit 501(c)(3). Their goal was to create a new clinical setting that would provide both state-of-the-art psychotherapy and comprehensive training opportunities for professionals worldwide.
Over the past 20 years, our organization has carried out Dr. Beck’s therapeutic model and guiding principles in training more than 3,500 professionals through our Center for Training, and providing clinical therapy services to over 2,000 individuals, couples, and families through our Center for Psychotherapy.
In addition to our professional workshops and on-site psychotherapy practice, Beck Institute remains an international authority on, and resource for, CBT information and research. Our organization continues to partner with universities, hospitals, community mental health centers, health systems, and other institutions to create and improve cognitive behavior therapy programs.

Uptown Dallas Counseling provides CBT for anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, and other mental health problems.

Uptown Dallas Counseling writes about Diet and Mental Health

mental health and diet

From the University of Melbourne via Uptown Dallas Counseling:

Evidence is rapidly growing showing vital relationships between both diet quality and potential nutritional deficiencies and mental health, a new international collaboration led by the University of Melbourne and Deakin University has revealed.

Published in The Lancet Psychiatry today, leading academics state that as with a range of medical conditions, psychiatry and public health should now recognize and embrace diet and nutrition as key determinants of mental health.

Lead author, Dr Jerome Sarris from the University of Melbourne and a member of the International Society for Nutritional Psychiatry Research (ISNPR), said psychiatry is at a critical stage, with the current medically-focused model having achieved only modest benefits in addressing the global burden of poor mental health.

“While the determinants of mental health are complex, the emerging and compelling evidence for nutrition as a key factor in the high prevalence and incidence of mental disorders suggests that nutrition is as important to psychiatry as it is to cardiology, endocrinology and gastroenterology,” Dr Sarris said.

“In the last few years, significant links have been established between nutritional quality and mental health. Scientifically rigorous studies have made important contributions to our understanding of the role of nutrition in mental health,” he said.

Findings of the review revealed that in addition to dietary improvement, evidence now supports the contention that nutrient-based prescription has the potential to assist in the management of mental disorders at the individual and population level.

Studies show that many of these nutrients have a clear link to brain health, including omega-3s, B vitamins (particularly folate and B12), choline, iron, zinc, magnesium, S-adenosyl methionine (SAMe), vitamin D, and amino acids.

“While we advocate for these to be consumed in the diet where possible, additional select prescription of these as nutraceuticals (nutrient supplements) may also be justified,” Dr Sarris said.

Associate Professor Felice Jacka, a Principal Research Fellow from Deakin University and president of the ISNPR noted that many studies have shown associations between healthy dietary patterns and a reduced prevalence of and risk for depression and suicide across cultures and age groups.

“Maternal and early-life nutrition is also emerging as a factor in mental health outcomes in children, while severe deficiencies in some essential nutrients during critical developmental periods have long been implicated in the development of both depressive and psychotic disorders,” she said.

A systematic review published in late 2014 has also confirmed a relationship between ‘unhealthy’ dietary patterns and poorer mental health in children and adolescents. Given the early age of onset for depression and anxiety, these data point to dietary improvement as a way of preventing the initial incidence of common mental disorders.

Dr Sarris, an executive member of the ISNPR, believes that it is time to advocate for a more integrative approach to psychiatry, with diet and nutrition as key elements.

“It is time for clinicians to consider diet and additional nutrients as part of the treating package to manage the enormous burden of mental ill health,” he said.

HUGS are GOOD

Megan at TipsyWriter offers 4 Fun Facts on why hugs are so great.

HUGS ARE GOOD

Uptown Dallas Counseling provides therapy for depression and anxiety.  For appointments for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Contact Holly Scott at www.UptownDallasCounseling.com


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Depression & Humor: Can they go together?

 

mental illness

Ruby Wax

Comedian and actress Ruby Wax gave a TED talk where she spoke about her struggles with depression.  She used lots of comedy mixed with some serious science and statistics about depression.

According to the World Health Organization, 1 in 4 people will experience a mental health issue at some point in their lives, but two-thirds will never seek help from a professional. Even when you isolate the U.S. population, the numbers are the same.

If you are suffering from depression or other type of mental illness, seek help from a professional.  You are not alone.  You do not have to go through this alone.

TED talk by Ruby Wax on Mental Illness