Is your family watching 13 Reasons Why?

If you and your family are watching http://4lstrategies.com/leadership/ 13 Reasons Why? on Netflix, you may want to have some discussions on the topic of suicide. From the Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC)’s newsletter, April 7, 2017:

suicide

Photo Courtesy of Netflix

Suicide Awareness Voices of Education (SAVE) has released a set of talking points to address suicide-related content in the new Netflix series, 13 Reasons Why, which is based on a fictional novel by the same name. SAVE developed the talking points in partnership with the Jed Foundation to help parents, teachers, and other gatekeepers talk with youth about suicide as it relates to the situational drama that unfolds in the series.

SUICIDE

From Uptown Dallas Counseling Study Tips.

Looking for a way to improve your studying skills?  Joseph Stromberg of Vox.com writes about his interview with psychologists Henry Roediger and Mark McDaniel — who’ve spent a combined 80 years studying learning and memory, and recently distilled their findings with novelist Peter Brown in the book Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning.  Here is a summary of their findings.

STUDY SMARTER

For more information on smart studying skills, contact Holly Scott at Uptown Dallas Counseling.

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Who gets Depression? What does it look like? How will I know?

what is depression

What is depression?

I love this video created by the Canadian Family Law Firm of Neinstien & Associates.  They published this video to show their support for the annual http://ocvocations.org/?sccss=1  Let’s Talk Day.  This event helps bring the topic of mental health and depression to the forefront in an attempt to break the stigma of suffering from a mental disorder.

Quotes from the participants in the video include:

I am a mother, a father, a student.  I am loving, smart, generous.  I am alone, in a room full of people.  I want to feel anything, I can’t stand to feel anything, I want the pain to go away.  Depression is not a mood, depression is not a bad day, depression is a disease.  It feels like I am underwater, I need help.  Please don’t judge me, don’t give up on me.

Take a few minutes to watch and see what you think.  Please spread the word.

Holly Scott, MBA, MS, LPC sees clients at Uptown Dallas Counseling. Holly is trained in the specialty of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and holds the position of Diplomate in the Academy of Cognitive Therapy. Holly works with clients to help them overcome challenges in their daily lives that may be preventing them from achieving happiness. She helps clients with stress management, depression, parenting, marriage counseling, and other mental health concerns. If you are looking for a counselor or therapist, explore this website to see if Holly may be able to help you. 

To make an appointment for therapy or counseling with Holly at her Uptown Dallas Counseling, you have the option of using the Online Patient Portal to register and schedule. 

The Fault in our Stars by John Green

book recommendation the Fault in our Stars
I love this book!  If you are looking for something to read, check out John Green‘s The Fault in our Stars.
It appears a lot of other people love it, too:
#1 New York Times bestseller
#1 Wall Street Journal bestseller
#9 The Bookseller (UK) bestseller
#1 Indiebound bestseller
New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice
Starred reviews from Booklist, SLJ, Publisher’s Weekly, Horn Book, and Kirkus

Fox Pictures is releasing a movie next year, here’s the IMBD plot summary:
Hazel and Gus are two teenagers who share an acerbic wit, a disdain for the conventional, and a love that sweeps them on a journey. Their relationship is all the more miraculous, given that Hazel’s other constant companion is an oxygen tank, Gus jokes about his prosthetic leg, and they met and fell in love at a cancer support group. 

For more information on the author and this book, here is John Green’s Webpage

The Fault in our Stars

 

 
 

Ideas for Healthy Parenting: Emotional Boundaries

Mari Levy, MA, MFTi, writes in the goodtherapy.org blog on setting healthy emotional boundaries with your children.

parenting

She states:

healthy parenting means you love and accept them for who they are, set reasonable expectations and consequences for unacceptable behavior, and in other ways provide a “stable bow” from which your child (the arrow) flies. Accepting your child as a whole, unique person with his or her own path to follow is part of the bittersweet job of parenthood.
 
Ms. Levy gives additional reasonable, proactive advice for parents in her article.  The full blog post is here.

Holly Scott, MBA, MS, LPC sees clients at Uptown Dallas Counseling. Holly is trained in the specialty of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and holds the position of Diplomate in the Academy of Cognitive Therapy. Holly works with clients to help them overcome challenges in their daily lives that may be preventing them from achieving happiness. She helps clients with stress management, depression, parenting, marriage counseling, and other mental health concerns. If you are looking for a counselor or therapist, explore this website to see if Holly may be able to help you. 

To make an appointment for therapy or counseling with Holly at her Uptown Dallas Counseling, you have the option of using the Online Patient Portal to register and schedule. 

Suicide Awareness Program.

Active Minds, an organization dedicated to spreading suicide awareness on college campuses, kicked off its tour of Send Silence Packing on September 10, 2013.  The tour is an exhibit of 1100 backpacks that represent the 1100 college students who die by suicide every year.  More details of the tour can be found here.

Are you in crisis? Please call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline 
at 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255)

suicide awareness

Active Minds traveling suicide awareness program of 1,100 backpacks representing the 1,100 college student lives lost to suicide each year is taking a heading to California. The tour is kicked off on September 10, World Suicide Prevention Day, at Riverside City College in Riverside, CA.

 
Suicide is one of the most frightening possible outcomes of mental illness. If you or someone you know needs help, call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) immediately. This is the number for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, a 24-hour service available to anyone in need of help. Never ignore or underestimate remarks about suicide. Take them seriously, and make certain that the person in crisis is cared for. And if you think your friend is in immediate danger, do not leave him or her alone—stay there and call 911 or the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).
Additional Information from Active Minds:
An extensive list of web resources can be found here:  http://www.activeminds.org/issues-a-resources/mental-health-resources

CBT for Teens

CBT for Teens is a workshop being offered by a group in New York City.  I just signed up  at the American Institute for Cognitive Therapy.  Workshop will be lead by Dr. Laura Reigada, and focus on Cognitive Behavioral skills when working with children and their parents.  I look forward to learning new skills and insight into parent-child relationships.

CBT for teens
Dr. Reigada’s Training:

Laura Reigada Ph.D.,  American Institute for Cognitive Therapy, is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at Brooklyn College of the City University of New York and an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. She completed a two-year NIMH postdoctoral clinical research fellowship at the Institute for Anxiety and Mood Disorders, at the NYU Child Study Center, within the NYU School of Medicine. Dr Reigada continued her education by becoming a NIH Child, Intervention, Prevention and Services fellow. Currently she has grant funding to develop and test an integrative cognitivebehavioral intervention that jointly addresses anxiety and physical complaints within the context of pediatric chronic illness. Based on her research, the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America named her the first Goldman Scholar in Pediatric Research. Dr. Reigada has extensive clinical experience working with children and adults on anxiety, mood disorders, parenting, school avoidance, functional pain and chronic illness. She is a founding member, and pastpresident, of the New York City Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Organization.

College and Mental Health

Adolescents-2The Jed Foundation is a not-for-profit organization that promotes emotional health among college students.  The foundation’s Medical Director, Dr. Victor Schwartz, states “of the 20 million students in post-secondary education in the United States, 20 percent have received counseling or some type of mental health diagnosis.”

Many colleges and universities are reviewing and updating their comprehensive mental health and suicide prevention programs.  In an article based on an interview with Dr. Schwartz, Matthew Lynch, Ed. D. summarizes the Jed Foundation’s recommendations for schools to strengthen their mental health support systems.  The foundation recommends:

  • Engaging in campus-wide strategic planning to identify specific issues related to mental health and substance abuse and develop action plans to address them
  • Training new faculty, students and staff to identify at-risk students and refer them to appropriate counseling services
  • Advocating for mental health as a campus-wide issue
  • Creating a task force to promote mental health
  • Increasing programs to identify and support incoming at-risk students
  • Engaging in environmental safety scans of a campus to locate potential sources of danger
  • Building student affairs programs that enhance life skills and student connectedness
If you have a college student, I encourage you to explore the school’s mental health program.  Increasing awareness of resources available to students is key to their success.
  Dr. Lynch’s entire article appears in his HuffingtonPost blog here.

Back to School Means Study Time

Are you or someone you know returning to school this week?  Here is a nice summary of efficient study skills from Scientific American.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=psychologists-identify-best-ways-to-study

studying

FEELING STRESSED OUT???

anxiety-adolescent

A recently-published study on the effects of altruism led by Michael J. Poulin of the University of Buffalo, followed 846 people over five years. The participants were all dealing with some level of stress in their lives.  The researchers tracked the amount of time these people spent helping others.  Dr Poulin summarizes the results of the study as, “we found that when dealing with stressful situations, those who had helped others during the previous year were less likely to die than those who had not helped others.”  For non-helpers, though, each stressful event increased the chance of dying over the next five years by 30 percent.

Wow.  Helping out others can significantly decrease your chance of dying!  Researchers do not yet understand why this relationship exists and continue to study possible causes.  They think the effect may come from the same biological mechanisms that drive parents to care for their children—such as the neurohormone oxytocin—which Dr. Poulin states, “can reduce certain physical responses to stress.” 

clomid buy cheap In the meantime, when you are feeling stressed, think about helping a friend, relative, or neighbor.  The act will distract your mind from the stressful situation, but also may help you live longer!

A more detailed review of the research study and a link to the study can be found in an article from The Greater Good.