Bravo, Kate Middleton!

http://littleexplorersfamilydaycare.com/faq In this video, HRH The Duchess of Cambridge pledges her support for children’s mental health by endorsing The Place to Be, a charitable organization for children in the UK.  The Pace to Be is “the leading UK provider of school-based mental health support, unlocking children’s potential in the classroom – and beyond.”

The Place to be has declared February 16-22 the first Children’s Mental Health Week in the UK.  Thanks to all who are bringing this important message to the public.

#ChildrensMHW

Uptown Dallas Counseling provides CBT: Aaron Beck’s Blueprint

CBT Uptown Dallas Counseling

Dr. Aaron Beck, founder of CBT

Uptown Dallas Counseling provides CBT or Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.  The founder of CBT, Dr. Aaron Beck, explains his view of CBT in this 6-minute audio track.

Dr. Beck founded the Beck Institute of Cognitive Therapy in 1994.  From the Beck Institute website:

Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy is a leading international source for training, therapy, and resources in CBT. Our Center for Training delivers workshops to a worldwide audience of mental health professionals, researchers, and educators, and our Philadelphia-based Center for Psychotherapy provides state-of-the-art therapy and consultations.
Dr. Aaron T. Beck developed Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) at the University of Pennsylvania in the 1960s. In 1994, Dr. Beck and his daughter, Dr. Judith Beck, established Beck Institute as a non-profit 501(c)(3). Their goal was to create a new clinical setting that would provide both state-of-the-art psychotherapy and comprehensive training opportunities for professionals worldwide.
Over the past 20 years, our organization has carried out Dr. Beck’s therapeutic model and guiding principles in training more than 3,500 professionals through our Center for Training, and providing clinical therapy services to over 2,000 individuals, couples, and families through our Center for Psychotherapy.
In addition to our professional workshops and on-site psychotherapy practice, Beck Institute remains an international authority on, and resource for, CBT information and research. Our organization continues to partner with universities, hospitals, community mental health centers, health systems, and other institutions to create and improve cognitive behavior therapy programs.

Uptown Dallas Counseling provides CBT for anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, and other mental health problems.

CBT for Weight Loss in Dallas

Weight LossLooking for CBT for Weight Loss in the Dallas area?  Uptown Dallas Counseling can help.

From The Beck Diet Solution workbook:  Feeling deprived is a state of mind. You can limit yourself to one cookie and think, “This is so unfair, I wish I could eat more, this really stinks,” OR you could limit yourself to one cookie and think, “It’s not all-or-nothing. I can still have one cookie and lose weight. Good for me for stopping here, this will really help me reach my goals.”

If you are looking for help in using CBT for Weight Loss in Dallas, Uptown Dallas Counseling can help.

Uptown Dallas Counseling Favorite Post

Uptown Dallas Counseling shares a favorite post from 2014:

Comedian and actress Ruby Wax gave a TED talk where she spoke about her struggles with depression. She used lots of comedy mixed with some serious science and statistics about depression.
According to the World Health Organization, 1 in 4 people will experience a mental health issue at some point in their lives, but two-thirds will never seek help from a professional. Even when you isolate the U.S. population, the numbers are the same.
If you are suffering from depression or other type of mental illness, seek help from a professional. You are not alone. You do not have to go through this alone.
TED talk by Ruby Wax on Mental Illness
uptown dallas counseling happiness

Uptown Dallas Counseling writes about Diet and Mental Health

mental health and diet

From the University of Melbourne via Uptown Dallas Counseling:

Evidence is rapidly growing showing vital relationships between both diet quality and potential nutritional deficiencies and mental health, a new international collaboration led by the University of Melbourne and Deakin University has revealed.

Published in The Lancet Psychiatry today, leading academics state that as with a range of medical conditions, psychiatry and public health should now recognize and embrace diet and nutrition as key determinants of mental health.

Lead author, Dr Jerome Sarris from the University of Melbourne and a member of the International Society for Nutritional Psychiatry Research (ISNPR), said psychiatry is at a critical stage, with the current medically-focused model having achieved only modest benefits in addressing the global burden of poor mental health.

“While the determinants of mental health are complex, the emerging and compelling evidence for nutrition as a key factor in the high prevalence and incidence of mental disorders suggests that nutrition is as important to psychiatry as it is to cardiology, endocrinology and gastroenterology,” Dr Sarris said.

“In the last few years, significant links have been established between nutritional quality and mental health. Scientifically rigorous studies have made important contributions to our understanding of the role of nutrition in mental health,” he said.

Findings of the review revealed that in addition to dietary improvement, evidence now supports the contention that nutrient-based prescription has the potential to assist in the management of mental disorders at the individual and population level.

Studies show that many of these nutrients have a clear link to brain health, including omega-3s, B vitamins (particularly folate and B12), choline, iron, zinc, magnesium, S-adenosyl methionine (SAMe), vitamin D, and amino acids.

“While we advocate for these to be consumed in the diet where possible, additional select prescription of these as nutraceuticals (nutrient supplements) may also be justified,” Dr Sarris said.

Associate Professor Felice Jacka, a Principal Research Fellow from Deakin University and president of the ISNPR noted that many studies have shown associations between healthy dietary patterns and a reduced prevalence of and risk for depression and suicide across cultures and age groups.

“Maternal and early-life nutrition is also emerging as a factor in mental health outcomes in children, while severe deficiencies in some essential nutrients during critical developmental periods have long been implicated in the development of both depressive and psychotic disorders,” she said.

A systematic review published in late 2014 has also confirmed a relationship between ‘unhealthy’ dietary patterns and poorer mental health in children and adolescents. Given the early age of onset for depression and anxiety, these data point to dietary improvement as a way of preventing the initial incidence of common mental disorders.

Dr Sarris, an executive member of the ISNPR, believes that it is time to advocate for a more integrative approach to psychiatry, with diet and nutrition as key elements.

“It is time for clinicians to consider diet and additional nutrients as part of the treating package to manage the enormous burden of mental ill health,” he said.