The Fault in our Stars by John Green

book recommendation the Fault in our Stars
I love this book!  If you are looking for something to read, check out John Green‘s The Fault in our Stars.
It appears a lot of other people love it, too:
#1 New York Times bestseller
#1 Wall Street Journal bestseller
#9 The Bookseller (UK) bestseller
#1 Indiebound bestseller
New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice
Starred reviews from Booklist, SLJ, Publisher’s Weekly, Horn Book, and Kirkus

Fox Pictures is releasing a movie next year, here’s the IMBD plot summary:
Hazel and Gus are two teenagers who share an acerbic wit, a disdain for the conventional, and a love that sweeps them on a journey. Their relationship is all the more miraculous, given that Hazel’s other constant companion is an oxygen tank, Gus jokes about his prosthetic leg, and they met and fell in love at a cancer support group. 

For more information on the author and this book, here is John Green’s Webpage

The Fault in our Stars

 

 
 

Benefits of Sleep: it Cleans your Brain.

A new study from National Institutes of Health on the benefits of sleep shows sleep may actually clean the brain. Scientists have recently discovered a process by which the brain actually flushes toxins out of spaces between cells.  We are not yet sure of the significance of this information, but it may help explain why sleep and mental health are so closely related.  A summary of the study here, explains some of the findings.

benefits of sleep

Holly Scott, MBA, MS, LPC sees clients at Uptown Dallas Counseling. Holly is trained in the specialty of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and holds the position of Diplomate in the Academy of Cognitive Therapy. Holly works with clients to help them overcome challenges in their daily lives that may be preventing them from achieving happiness. She helps clients with stress management, depression, parenting, marriage counseling, and other mental health concerns. If you are looking for a counselor or therapist, explore this website to see if Holly may be able to help you. 

To make an appointment for therapy or counseling with Holly at her Uptown Dallas Counseling, you have the option of using the Online Patient Portal to register and schedule. 

Getting through the Hard Days of Depression

Getting through the hard days of depression can be extremely difficult.  People diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder often feel better pretty quickly once they begin treatment with therapy, medication, or both.  Unfortunately, even when the person is completely compliant with treatment recommendations, there can be relapses.  Patients can experience an unexpected setback as they are recovering.
major depressive disorder
Many times the patient is completely surprised and alarmed by this sudden drop in mood.  Illinois therapist and writer Jacqueline Marshall gives suggestions on how to handle those really bad days as part of her article on PSYWEB.com.

Ms Marshall’s techniques can provide relief for many people. Her suggestions include relaxation, breathing, distraction, and seeking support from friends and family.

It is important to remember, however, there may be a time when you do not find relief from any of these methods.  If you think you are in danger of hurting yourself, call 911 and ask for help.

Holly Scott, MBA, MS, LPC sees clients at Uptown Dallas Counseling. Holly is trained in the specialty of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and holds the position of Diplomate in the Academy of Cognitive Therapy. Holly works with clients to help them overcome challenges in their daily lives that may be preventing them from achieving happiness. She helps clients with stress management, depression, parenting, marriage counseling, and other mental health concerns. If you are looking for a counselor or therapist, explore this website to see if Holly may be able to help you. 

To make an appointment for therapy or counseling with Holly at her Uptown Dallas Counseling, you have the option of using the Online Patient Portal to register and schedule. 

Controlling Emotions: Is it possible?

This discussion about controlling emotions compares two different women’s reactions to the same event.

 

http://coloradomasterstrackandfield.club/locations/25/5280-challenge/ First Woman’s Reaction:  Take a Picture

controlling emotions

From Hannah Price’s collection, City of Brotherly Love

When photographer Hannah Price moved from Colorado to Philadelphia, she began to experience something new to her – catcalls from men on the street. After several catcalling episodes, she decided to take action.  She would either snap a photo of the man immediately; or she would talk with him about the incident, and then ask if she could make his portrait. Ms Price created a project called “City of Brotherly Love” from these photographs.

Ms Price states her project is not meant to be an aggressive rebuttal to the individuals in the photos. It is, she states, “just a way of trying to understand it. It was way for me to just deal with it on another level besides avoiding it. Sometimes it’s easier to … just respond….. you just start talking to people, you find out more about them than your initial [impression].”

To see the complete 17-photo collection, see the NPR blog post of Code Switch by Kat Chow.

buy neurontin overnight Second Woman’s Reaction:  Send a Message

controlling emotions

Tatyana Fazlalizadeh’s original posters on Tompkins Ave. in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. (Stephen Nessen/WNYC)

Brooklyn artist Tatiana Fazlalizadeh’s response to her experiences in Brooklyn is very different from Ms. Price’s response with the photography project. She created posters with direct negative messages to the catcallers and posted them around her neighborhood.  Ms Fazlalizadeh states she can’t walk down her street without getting catcalled or harassed. “It happens almost daily to me where I get frustrated or annoyed or upset by something that someone has said to me or done to me outside on the street.”

Ms Fazlalizadeh used her posters to try and rally the neighborhood around her efforts to stop the cat-calling.  She hopes that by calling attention to the negative effects of this behavior, the men will change.

controlling emotionscontrolling emotions

Why the Difference?

Why does one woman feel okay to take photos and even have a conversation about the experience, and another woman feel anger and frustration?  Our individual responses to catcalls are a result of our thoughts about the experience. If we think: “wow, someone thinks I’m cute.”, “I still have it”, or “this is going to be a good day”, our response may be:  happiness, a big smile, a skip in our step, better posture.

If we think:  “that reminds me of my abusive former boyfriend”, “will he try to come after me?”, “they must think I am promiscuous”, our response may be:  fear, increased heart rate, hunched posture, a frown, anger.

I am not expressing approval of the long-standing phenomenon of men yelling things to women in public places.  My writing about this behavior is focused on the difference in the two responses, not a right or a wrong response.  I believe this is a perfect example of the Cognitive Model theory in action.  The theory is:
Our THOUGHTS about a SITUATION create our REACTIONS, which are EMOTIONAL and PHYSICAL.   In Cognitive Therapy, we focus on our THOUGHTS.  A few of the questions we may ask in therapy about our THOUGHTS are:
What are they? Are they true? How much do we believe them? How do we change them?  
 
Through training and practice, you can learn to control or change your thoughts that create negative reactions.  This type of training has been shown through extensive scientific testing to be an affective way to treat depression, anxiety, OCD, PTSD, and other mental health challenges.  My opinion on catcalling is that, for so many women, the experience generates extremely negative feelings; therefore, I do not like the behavior.  For further information and discussions on ending street harassment see Hollaback!.
Sources:
Stephen Nessen : Reporter, WNYC, Not Taking it Anymore: One Woman Talks Back to Street Harassers, Friday, April 19, 2013
Newshttp://www.wnyc.org/story/282239-not-taking-it-anymore-one-woman-talks-back-street-harassers/

Kat Chow, A Photographer Turns Her Lens On Men Who Catcall, October 17, 2013.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/10/17/235413025/a-photographer-turns-her-lens-on-men-who-cat-call?utm_content=socialflow&utm_campaign=nprfacebook&utm_source=npr&utm_medium=facebook

 

In Honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Give a Mammogram

Early detection is the key to surviving breast cancer.  Many women cannot afford the $100 average cost of a mammogram.  In honor of Breast Cancer Month, the National Breast Cancer Foundation is asking for donations to help fund their efforts to provide services for women who cannot afford them.

depression and cancer

You can make a donation here:

Your gift will support the National Mammography Program where NBCF partners with medical facilities across the country to provide free mammograms and diagnostic breast care services to under-served women.

Treating depression in Cancer Patients

 

treating depression in cancer patientsCecelia Gittleson writes in Memorial Sloan-Kettering‘s Cancer Center newsletter about the importance of diagnosing and treating depression in cancer patients.  She discusses sources of support for patients, survivors, and their caregivers.

Ms. Gittelson quotes a physician who specializes in the psychological treatment of people with breast cancer and their families on the importance of psychosocial support, “We’ve learned that depressed people generally do less well in the oncology setting,” explains Memorial Sloan-Kettering psychiatrist Mary Jane Massie. “This is probably due in part to the fact that because they feel bad — psychologically, physically, or both —they decide it isn’t useful to take their medications. And there can be a domino effect: They stop filling their prescriptions and may even start to miss medical appointments. But there is a lot of help available.”

I encourage anyone who is struggling with a cancer diagnosis, no matter which stage of treatment, to reach out to a mental health professionals.  Ms. Gittelson’s article and her recommendations for sources of support are here.

Holly Scott, MBA, MS, LPC sees clients at Uptown Dallas Counseling. Holly is trained in the specialty of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and holds the position of Diplomate in the Academy of Cognitive Therapy. Holly works with clients to help them overcome challenges in their daily lives that may be preventing them from achieving happiness. She helps clients with stress management, depression, parenting, marriage counseling, and other mental health concerns. If you are looking for a counselor or therapist, explore this website to see if Holly may be able to help you. 

To make an appointment for therapy or counseling with Holly at her Uptown Dallas Counseling, you have the option of using the Online Patient Portal to register and schedule. 

Postpartum Depression: Tragic Consequences

Did Miriam Carey have Postpartum depression?

postpartum depression

From CBS News: Emergency personal help an injured person after a shooting on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013. Police say the U.S. Capitol has been put on a security lockdown amid reports of possible shots fired outside the building. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci) The small photo comes from what is believed to be the Facebook page of Miriam Carey, who according to multiple police sources, allegedly led authorities on a car chase near the U.S. Capitol on Oct. 3, 2013. / FACEBOOK / EVAN VUCCI/AP/FACEBOOK

We may never know whether Ms. Carey was suffering from postpartum depression when she drove from her home in Connecticut with her 1-year old daughter to Washington, DC., where she lost her life after being shot by police.  At approximately 2:00 in the afternoon on Thursday, October 3, Ms. Carey rammed her car into a temporary barrier in front of the White House, then lead officers on a chase down Pennsylvania Avenue.  Police cars surrounded Ms Carey’s car at Garfield Circle, just south of the Capitol.  Ms. Carey then rammed a Secret Service car (pictured below) in an attempt to escape.

postpartum depression

From USA Today

At this point, officers began to fire shots at Ms Carey’s car.  She then drove to Constitution Avenue before eventually stopping in the 100 block of Maryland Avenue NE, near the Hart Senate Office Building.  She fled from her car on foot and was shot and killed.  Her daughter, who had been in the backseat, was unharmed.
Ms. Carey’s mother, Idella Carey, stated her daughter had been suffering from postpartum depression and had been hospitalized once for the condition.  Other relatives stated Ms Carey believed her apartment was under surveillance and that she was being stalked by President Obama.  Amy Carey-Jones, a sister, spoke to Ms. Carey about a week ago and believed her sister was fine.
Postpartum depression can be difficult to diagnose and monitor.  It is possible Ms. Carey had a severe form of the disease, Postpartum Psychosis (PPP), a rare condition that affects only 1 or 2 women in 1000.  PPP can suddenly come out of nowhere and present any time up to one year after the birth of a baby.  Sufferers and their caregivers are usually totally unprepared with how to cope with the symptoms of this disease.
postpartum depression
Ms. Storrs recommends that family members and friends of a new mother immediately notify a healthcare professional or local emergency department if she suddenly starts showing any of the following signs:
• Acting very energetic or agitated
• Being unable to get out of bed
• Showing unusual or nonsensical behavior
• Acting fearful or paranoid
• Believing bizarre ideas, such as thinking that the baby is the devil

postpartum depression

printed with permission from deamstime

One of the most difficult aspects of PPP is that the new mother does not believe she is ill, and she will often be very resistant to treatment.   Additionally, the worldwide publicity surrounding some especially gruesome PPP outcomes (Andrea Yates drowning her 5 children in 1991) has added to the negative stigma associated with any postpartum mental illness.  Because there is so much misinformation, many new mothers with even slight symptoms can become scared and refuse to seek help.
The vast majority of women who do develop this rare illness are never a threat to themselves or their children.  Early treatment from a qualified mental health professional can have a significant impact on alleviating the symptoms and speeding the treatment of this disease.